Gas Prices

Menstuff® has compiled the following information on the Price of Gas.

A New Concept to Reduce Gas Prices
3.7.03

A New Concept to Reduce Gas Prices


There's talk that we are going to hit close to $3.00 a gallon by the summer. Want gasoline prices to come down? We need to take some intelligent, united action. Phillip Hollsworth, offered this good idea: This makes MUCH MORE SENSE than the "don't buy gas on a certain day" campaign that was going around last April or May! The oil companies just laughed at that because they knew we wouldn't continue to "hurt" ourselves by refusing to buy gas. It was more of an inconvenience to us than it was a problem for them.

BUT, who ever thought of this idea, has come up with a plan that can really work.

Now that the oil companies and the OPEC nations have conditioned us to think that the cost of a gallon of gas is CHEAP at $1.50- $1.75, we need to take aggressive action to teach them that BUYERS control the Marketplace....not sellers.

With the price of gasoline going up more each day, we consumers need to take action. The only way we are going to see the price of gas come down is if we hit someone in the pocketbook by not purchasing their gas! And we can do that WITHOUT hurting ourselves.

How? Since we all rely on our cars, we can't just stop buying gas. But we CAN have an impact on gas prices if we all act together to force a price war.

Here's the idea:

For the rest of this year, DON"T purchase ANY gasoline from the two biggest companies (which now are one), EXXON and MOBIL. If they are not selling any gas, they will be inclined to reduce their prices. If they reduce their prices, the other companies will have to follow suit. But to have an impact, we need to reach literally millions of Exxon and Mobil gas buyers. It's really simple to do!

Now, don't whimp out on me at this point...keep reading and I'll explain how simple it is to reach millions of people!!

I am sending this note to about thirty people. If each of you send it to at least ten more (30 x 10 =300)... and those 300 send it to at least ten more (300 x 10 = 3,000) ... and so on, by the time the message reaches the sixth generation of people, we will have reached over THREE MILLION consumers!

If those three million get excited and pass this on to ten friends each, then 30 million people will have been contacted! If it goes one level further, you guessed it..... THREE HUNDRED MILLION PEOPLE!!!

Again, all you have to do is send this to 10 people and DON"T purchase ANY gasoline from EXXON and MOBIL. That's all.

How long would all that take? If each of us sends this email out to ten or more people within one day of receipt, all 300 MILLION people could conceivably be contacted within the next 8 days!!! I'll bet you didn't think you and I had that much potential, did you! Acting together we can make a difference. If this makes sense to you, please pass this message on.

THIS CAN REALLY WORK.

3/7/03 - Gasoline prices are expected to continue their upward climb and reach a record national average of $1.76 a gallon in April, the Energy Department forecast yesterday. It predicted gas prices will average about $1.70 a gallon for regular brands through the summer driving season.

Gasoline prices have soared during the past month because of high crude oil costs, heavy demand for heating oil and tight inventories of crude as well as most petroleum products. 

Already many parts of the country have been paying $2 or more at the pump. This week prices soared on the West Coast, where refining problems added to the price spike.

Gasoline prices increased to an average of $1.68 a gallon nationally this week, a hike of nearly 3 cents from last week and 54 cents higher than a year ago. Prices on the West Coast took the biggest jump, increasing by 8.5 cents to $1.93 a gallon, according to the Energy Information Administration.

"With the driving season beginning next month, pump prices are expected to continue to rise,' said the EIA in a short-term energy forecast released yesterday.

The EIA said gasoline inventories remained tight, close to the lower end of the five-year average. This "is one of the reasons current pump prices are high," said the EIA, the department's statistical agency.

The $1.76 a gallon forecast for April would be a nickel more per gallon than the record high of $1.71 set in May 2001, said the agency.

These prices would still be somewhat of a bargain compared to gasoline costs in 1981 if inflation were taken into account, the EIA noted. Using today's dollar, motorists were paying the equivalent of $2.90 a gallon in March 1981, said the EIA.

The EIA said crude oil prices in February "moved higher than expected pushed by fears of war in Iraq, lower inventories (and) slow recovery of Venezuela's exports." The price of West Texas Intermediary, a benchmark crude, averaged $36 a barrel, a level not seen since October 1990, just months before the start of the Gulf War, the agency said.

Alluding to possible fighting in Iraq, the report said that "even without additional disruptions to world (oil) supply in the near term, prices are likely to remain on the high side and subject to substantial volatility through 2003."

Cold weather and tight supplies of both natural gas and heating oil caused residential heating bills to soar this winter.

The government estimated that if normal temperatures prevail through the end of this month, residential heating bills, compared with last year's cost, will be up by 30 percent for homes using natural gas, 60 percent for homes using oil, and 25 percent for homes using propane.

The cost of heating oil climbed to $1.83 cents a gallon this week, or 68 cents higher than a year ago, the government said. Propane increased to $1.72 a gallon, 60 cents more than a year ago. Natural gas prices have receded somewhat, but remained high.

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Better to be ignorant of a matter than half know it. - Publilius Syrus



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