Worst Jobs

Menstuff® has compiled the following information on the Worst Jobs.

Where the Money Is Not
They’re Dirty Jobs, But They Gotta Get Done
The 10 Deadliest Jobs in America
Killer Jobs - 2014
11 of the Worst Jobs for a Relationship

They’re Dirty Jobs, But They Gotta Get Done


Theirs are often thankless jobs, but without the following professionals, most of us probably wouldn’t be able to enjoy so many of the things we often take for granted, from clean bathrooms, homes and work spaces to the convenience of buying fresh fish and deli meats at the market.

The following occupations involve literally getting one’s hands dirty and withstanding a variety of gruesome conditions on a daily basis to make life a little less painful for the rest of us.

Steam cleaner

While most of us do our best to avoid dirt, grime and grease at all costs, steam cleaners seek them out in everything from vehicle engines to restaurant kitchens, where they can use high pressure steam hoses and detergent solutions to remove the offending substances.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $25,859/year

Butcher

Leaving work in blood-stained clothes would be a serious HR issue in many offices, but the practice is nothing unusual for a butcher, whose grisly work involves cutting and washing the innards of slaughtered animals to create sides of beef, steaks, sausage and ribs in slaughterhouses and meat-packing establishments. This job is not for the faint of heart.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $25,961/year

Farrier

Farriers inspect horse hooves for defects, trim and shape them and remove worn or defective shoes. Aside from the strain of shaping shoes with hammers and bending or squatting for long periods of time, farriers must also deal with unpleasant odors emanating from the horses and risk stepping in any number of “surprises” the horses leave behind.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $31,604/year

Slime line worker

Working the “slime line” at a fish processing plant is just as gruesome as it sounds. Slime line workers withstand the horrific smell and feel of blood and entrails in order to clean, de-bone and fillet fish in preparation for packaging, selling, cooking and serving.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $9.87/hour

Proctologist

Proctologists diagnose and treat diseases and disorders related to the anus, rectum and colon, a labor of love that involves getting up close and personal in order to inspect these areas frequently and even performing hands-on work to repair or remove the affected body parts.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $388,734/year

Livestock breeder

Livestock breeders raise livestock, such as cattle, goats, horses, sheep and swine, for the purposes of making meat, riding, providing working stock, showing or using for products like wool, milk and hair. They can’t be afraid to do a little dirty work, especially when it comes time to clean barns, stalls and pens, attend to animals in labor, treat ailments, brand, tag or butcher.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $31,495/year

Building inspector

For building inspectors, who complete assessments and determine insurance rates, squeezing into small, dark, hot crawl spaces and encountering such unpleasant things as vermin and pests, dirt, dust, dry rot and mold are all in a day’s work.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $55,245/year

Coroner

Real-life coroners, who direct the investigation of suspicious deaths, suicides, homicides, vehicle crashes and drug overdoses, know the work isn’t nearly as fast-paced or glamorous as it may be portrayed on TV. Performing autopsies is just one aspect of the job, for which they need to have a high tolerance for handling the smell, look and touch of body parts, bones, organs and fluids at all times.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $44,932/year

Coal miner

The demand for coal has increased over the past few years, thanks in part to its potential as an alternate energy source at a time when oil prices are skyrocketing. Assuming they can withstand the grueling conditions of working in dark, tiny tunnels as small as five feet high and often more than 500 feet underground where coal dust cloaks the air, those with the proper training and experience face favorable job prospects in coming years.

Average salary with benefits and bonuses: $38,353

Source: By Mary Lorenz, msn.careerbuilder.com/custom/msn/careeradvice/viewarticle.aspx?articleid=1177&SiteId=cbmsnhp41177&sc_extcmp=JS_1177_home1&GT1=10563&cbRecursionCnt=2&cbsid=7afce3277bea4825a0c4e0483e4a0bba-248793918-TS-4

Where the Money Is Not


The mean annual pay for all jobs is $39,190. In all, the lowest-paying 25 occupations employ 15.6 million people in America; the best-paying jobs employ 3 million. The lowest paid of all? People who cook, prepare and serve in fast-food joints, followed by dishwashers and busboys.

25 Lowest Paying Jobs

Category
Mean Annual Wage
One-year % Change
No. in Employment

Cooks, fast food

$15,960
3.0%
612,020

Dishwashers

$16,190
2.7%
502,770

Cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers

$16,320
3.3%
401,790

Counter Attendants

$16,950
3.5%
524,410

Gaming Dealers

$17,010
6.0%
82,960

Dining room and cafeteria attendants and bartender helpers

$16,320
3.3%
401,790

Hosts and hostesses, restaurant, lounge, and coffee shop

$16,860
2.6%
340,390

Counter attendants, cafeteria, food concession, and coffee shop

$16,950
3.5%
524,410

Gaming dealers

$17,010
6.0%
82,960

Shampooers

$17,050
4.5%
15,580

Waiters and waitresses

$17,190
5.4%
2,312,930

Ushers, lobby attendants, and ticket takers

$17,500
4.5%
101,530

Amusement and recreation attendants

$17,530
3.4%
235,670

Farm workers and laborers, crop, nursery, and greenhouse

$17,630
1.5%
230,780

Cashiers

$17,930
3.6%
3,479,390

Personal and home care aides

$18,180
2.7%
578,290

Lifeguards, ski patrol, and other recreational protective service workers

$18,410
2.2%
108,870

Parking lot attendants

$18,450
2.7%
131,870

Pressers, textile, garment, and related materials

$18,470
1.4%
75,150

Food preparation workers

$18,480
2.3%
871,470

Bartenders

$18,540
5.1%
485,120

Graders and sorters, agricultural products

$18,610
2.4%
45,890

Maids and housekeeping cleaners

$18,700
2.9%
900,040

Cooks, short order

$18,710
4.1%
189,610

Child care workers

$18,820
3.5%
572,950

Laundry and dry-cleaning workers

$18,890
2.4%
217,580

Service station attendants

$19,150
3.0%
94,780
* Mean Annual Wage

Source: jobs.aol.com/gallery/worst-paying-jobs?ncid=AOLCOMMjobsDYNLprim0001

The 10 Deadliest Jobs in America


59 fatalities recorded for top position in 2013. (And quess how many of those deaths were women?)

Although the national rate of workplace fatalities is on the decline, some jobs remain incredibly dangerous.

According to the latest Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) data, a total of 4,585 fatal work injuries were recorded in the US in 2013 — the second-lowest number recorded since the BLS began collecting this data in 1992.

10. Construction laborers

Total fatalities for 2013: 220

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 18.1

According to the BLS, these workers perform tasks involving physical labor at construction sites. They may operate hand and power tools of all types, and may clean and prepare sites, dig trenches, set braces to support the sides of excavations, erect scaffolding, and clean up rubble, debris, and other waste materials.

9. Electrical power-line installers and repairers

Total fatalities for 2013: 27

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 21.5

According to the BLS, these workers install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems.

8. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers

Total fatalities for 2013: 231

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 22.9

According to the BLS, farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers run establishments that produce crops, livestock, and dairy products.

7. Driver/sales workers and truck drivers

Total fatalities for 2013: 806

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 23.6

According to the BLS, these workers drive trucks or other vehicles over established routes or within an established territory and sell or deliver goods, such as food products, including restaurant take-out items, or pick up or deliver items such as commercial laundry. They may also take orders, collect payment, or stock merchandise at point of delivery.

6. Mining machine operators

Total fatalities for 2013: 16

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 26.9

According to the BLS, these workers operate self-propelled mining machines that rip coal, metal and nonmetal ores, rock, stone, or sand from the mine face and load it onto conveyors or into shuttle cars in a continuous operation.

5. Refuse and recyclable material collectors

Total fatalities for 2013: 33

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 33.0

According to the BLS, these workers collect and dump refuse or recyclable materials from containers into trucks.

4. Roofers

Total fatalities for 2013: 72

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 40.5

According to the BLS, roofers repair and install the roofs of buildings using a variety of materials, including shingles, asphalt, and metal.

3. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers

Total fatalities for 2013: 64

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 50.6

According to the BLS, these professionals pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-wing, multi-engine aircraft, usually on scheduled air carrier routes, for the transport of passengers and cargo.

2. Fishers and related fishing workers

Total fatalities for 2013: 27

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 75.0

According to the BLS, these workers catch and trap various types of marine life. The fish they catch are for human food, animal feed, bait, and other uses.

1. Logging workers

Total fatalities for 2013: 59

Fatality rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 91.3

According to the BLS, these workers harvest thousands of acres of forests each year. The timber they harvest provides the raw material for many consumer goods and industrial products.
Source: jobs.aol.com/articles/2015/05/19/deadliest-jobs-in-america/?SiteID=cbaolcompromotion_may_26&icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl24%7Csec1_lnk2%26pLid%3D-1741187542

Killer Jobs - 2014


The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) has come out with the latest (2014) statistics on the 15 most dangerous jobs. The Forbes website summarizes the data, including an annotated photo gallery. (Editor's note: Not included are active-duty military, especially in theaters of command in the world.)

And in a stunning turn-around, the jobs are held mostly by women!

Just kidding.

It's good to remember that everyone - even us men in less hazardous jobs - owes a debt of gratitude to those (mostly) men who are putting their lives on the line to feed us, house us, transport us, clean up after us, and install power lines.

The 15 Deadliest Jobs In America

While workplace hazard coverage often details the dangers of sitting at a computer for hours each day, none of the most dangerous jobs in America take place inside an office.

Thousands of workers across the U.S. die from injuries inflicted on the job each year. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) National Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries, 4,679 workers died of fatal work injuries in 2014, a rate of 3.3 workers per 100,000 full-time employees.

The data, released earlier this month, offers a preliminary look at workplace fatalities last year. Final data is expected to be published in the spring of 2016. In previous years, finalized statistics have demonstrated slightly higher rates, averaging an increase of 173 instances each year, ranging from 84 to 245.

The job with the highest fatality rate in 2014? Loggers, yet again. These workers, who harvest and transport timber for processing, often work in dangerous conditions and exposed to the elements, and usually earn annual wages in the mid-$30,000 range. This is the third year loggers, with a fatality rate of 109.5 workers per 100,000 full-time equivalent employees, have topped this list.

Fishers also maintain their rank for the third year running, coming in as the job with the second highest fatality rate. Fishermen and women, who, according to the BLS “catch and trap various types of marine life” to be used as food, feed, and bait, lost their lives at a rate of 80.8 workers per 100,000 full-time employees, in a job that tends to pay in the mid-$30,000 to low-$40,000 range.

Aircraft pilots and flight engineers come in fifth, with a fatality rate of 63.2 deaths per 100,000 full-time employees. Though this remains one of the occupations with the highest fatality rate year after year, nearly 76,000 Americans currently count themselves among this field, which pays a mean annual wage of $131,760.

The greatest number of workplace fatalities in 2014 were caused by transportation accidents, which account for 40% of work-related deaths. Deaths due to workplace violence decreased slightly; workplace homicide numbers remained steady while there was a dip in workplace suicides since 2013. Female workplace homicide victims were most likely to be attacked by a relative or partner, while workplace homicides involving male victims were usually related to robberies. ”Fatal falls, slips, and trips,” meanwhile, were up about 10%.

Fatalities among protective service occupations dropped 15% last year, to 211, due largely to a hefty decline in fatalities among firefighter and first-line supervisors of fire fighting and prevention workers, which dropped 51%. Despite overall good news within this group of occupations, fatalities among police officers and first-line supervisors of police and detectives increased significantly–17%–to 103 in 2014.

Deaths among workers aged 55 and older increased 9% in 2014, totaling 1,621 which, the summary notes, is “the highest annual total since the inception of the fatality census in 1992.”

Foreign-born workers accounted for 827 workplace fatalities in 2014. The greatest percentage of these workers, roughly 40, hailed from Mexico, though the group included individuals from 80 countries.

No. 1 Logging Workers

BLS definition: Logging workers harvest thousands of acres of forests each year. The timber they harvest provides the raw material for many consumer goods and industrial products. 2014 fatalities: 109.5
Data via the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Fatalities per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers.

No. 2 Fishers and Related Fishing Workers

BLS definition: Fishers and related fishing workers catch and trap various types of marine life. The fish they catch are for human food, animal feed, bait, and other uses. 2014 fatalities: 80.8

No. 3 Other Extraction Workers

BLS definition: All extraction workers not listed separately. 2014 fatalities: 51.9

No. 4 Roofers

BLS definition: Roofers repair and install the roofs of buildings using a variety of materials, including shingles, asphalt, and metal. 2014 fatalities: 46.2

No. 5 Aircraft Pilots and Flight Engineers

BLS definition: Pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-wing, multi-engine aircraft, usually on scheduled air carrier routes, for the transport of passengers and cargo. Requires Federal Air Transport certificate and rating for specific aircraft type used. Includes regional, National, and international airline pilots and flight instructors of airline pilots. 2014 fatalities: 63.2

No. 6 Refuse and Recyclable Material Collectors

BLS definition: Collect and dump refuse or recyclable materials from containers into truck. May drive truck. 2014 fatalities: 35.8

No. 7 Farmers, Ranchers, and Other Agricultural Managers

BLS definition: Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers run establishments that produce crops, livestock, and dairy products. 2014 fatalities: 26

No. 8 Structural Iron and Steel Workers

BLS definition: Structural iron and steel workers install iron or steel beams, girders, and columns to form buildings, bridges, and other structures. They are commonly referred to as ironworkers. 2014 fatalities: 25.2

No. 9 Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Occupations

BLS defition: This major group comprises the followingoccupations: First-Line Supervisors of Farming, Fishing, and Forestry Workers ;Agricultural Inspectors ; Animal Breeders ; Graders and Sorters, AgriculturalProducts ; Agricultural Equipment Operators ; Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop,Nursery, and Greenhouse ; Farmworkers, Farm, Ranch, and Aquacultural Animals ;Agricultural Workers, All Other ;Fishers and Related Fishing Workers ; Forestand Conservation Workers ; Fallers ; Logging Equipment Operators ; Log Gradersand Scalers ; Logging Workers, All Other 2014 fatalities: 24.1

No. 10 Driver/Sales Workers and Truck Drivers

BLS Definition: Delivery truck drivers and driver/sales workers pick up, transport, and drop off packages and small shipments within a local region or urban area. They drive trucks with a gross vehicle weight (GVW)—the combined weight of the vehicle, passengers, and cargo—of 26,000 pounds or less. Most of the time, delivery truck drivers transport merchandise from a distribution center to businesses and households. 2014 fatalities: 23.4

No. 11 Electrical Power-Line Installers and Repairers

BLS definition: Line installers and repairers (also known as line workers) install or repair electrical power systems and telecommunications cables, including fiber optics. 2014 fatalities: 19.2

No. 12 Miscellaneous Agricultural Workers

BLS definition: This broad occupation includes the following four detailedoccupations: Agricultural Equipment Operators; Farmworkers and Laborers, Crop,Nursery, and Greenhouse; Farmworkers, Farm, Ranch, and Aquacultural Animals; AgriculturalWorkers, All Other 2014 fatalities: 18.2

No. 13 First-Line Supervisors of Construction Trades and Extraction Workers

BLS definition: Directly supervise and coordinate activities of construction or extraction workers. 2014 fatalities: 17.9

No. 14 Taxi Drivers and Chauffeurs

BLS definition: Taxi drivers and chauffeurs drive people to and from the places they need to go, such as airports, homes, shopping centers, and workplaces. They must know their way around a city in order to take both residents and visitors to their destinations. 2014 fatalities: 17.2

No. 15 Construction Laborers

BLS definition: Construction laborers and helpers perform many basic tasks that require physical labor on construction sites. 2014 fatalities: 16.8
Source: www.forbes.com/sites/kathryndill/2015/09/23/the-15-deadliest-jobs-in-america/

11 of the Worst Jobs for a Relationship


1. Casino worker (and other gaming service worker)

Many casinos are open 24/7/365. Workers at these types of establishments often work irregular hours, and they may even have to work on holidays. In addition to working during odd hours, casino workers may work around alcohol, gambling, and a party-like environment — this can place added strain on a relationship, too.

A 2010 study of Census data published by the Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology found that gaming services workers had one of the highest divorce rates relative to other occupations. With a divorce rate of 31.4% (34.7% for gaming cage workers), this is exceptionally high when compared to the roughly 16% of Americans across all occupations who had been divorced or separated at the time of the data collection. And, to top it all off, gaming services workers are only paid a median salary of around $27,000 per year, per BLS estimates.

2. Massage therapist

We all know what it’s like to have that green-eyed monster emerge. In an Oprah.com publication, Helen Fisher describes jealousy as a “sickening combination of possessiveness, suspicion, rage, and humiliation.” It’s not unique to men or women, and even other species (like chimps and bluebirds) are faced with jealousy.

Given that the job of a massage therapist involves physical interaction, we probably don’t even need to explain why this occupation could place a burden on a relationship. “What type of clients did you have today?” and “What exactly did you do all day?” are some routine questions a message therapist may hear from a jealous significant other.

Massage therapists are paid a moderate salary — roughly $40,000 per year — to perform their services. According to the Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology study, the divorce rate across this occupation is exceptionally high, at 38.2%.

3. Waiter or bartender

Bartenders are consistently around people who are consuming alcohol. They are assigned the task of being in the center of it all, as a big part of their job is to improve the customer experience. It requires a certain degree of people skills to bartend, and some people are really great at it.

When you’re in a relationship, however, this job can be a source of problems. Bartenders may not know exactly what time they’ll be home from work — they often have to wait until all of the customers leave the establishment so they can perform their side-work before leaving for the night. The Journal study found that bartenders have the second-highest divorce rates, at 38.4%.

Waiters may face similar challenges to bartenders when it comes to maintaining a relationship. Odd hours, coupled with a unique work environment, can cause strain on any couple. Plus, waiters and bartenders may face financial issues, as they generally work for tips, which is a notoriously inconsistent form of income.

4. Athlete, entertainer, or dancer

Famous marriages, separations, divorces, and remarriages are often in the public eye. And with a 28.5% divorce rate among athletes, performers, entertainers, and related workers, there’s no shortage of juicy gossip in this arena. Maybe it’s the nature of the industry that places a strain on relationships: A large amount of travel, attention, and stress can place a burden on any couple.

Dancers and choreographers are in a similar boat. Rated No. 1 for the occupation that’s most likely to get divorced, dancers and choreographers have a 43.1% divorce rate.

5. Police and firefighters

Police officers and firefighters have some of the most dangerous jobs in modern America. Every day they leave the house, there’s a distinct chance that they can be injured or killed on duty. There are also other things that can stem from the everyday stress these public servants are subjected to, like mental health issues. For those in a relationship with someone holding one of these jobs? It can make it tough.

6. Politics

You’d have to imagine that it’s not easy being in Melania Trump’s shoes. Or Michelle Obama’s. Or anyone who’s married or in a relationship with any politician, really. Just look at what happened to Anthony Weiner. Or, if you really want your stomach to turn, watch the first episode of the show Black Mirror.

7. Military jobs

Being in a relationship with someone in the military, depending on the specifics, can be rough. Deployments can last for months or years. There’s a real chance that your loved one can come home severely injured or disabled — or be killed in action. The stress of the job can cause disorders like PTSD to develop as well, which can make a relationship even more difficult to handle.

8. Pilots and flight attendants

People who work in the airline industry can make it tough on their partners. They’re gone a lot. Traveling to different and exotic locales can put a strain on any relationship, especially if there’s jealousy or other underlying issues. Not only that, but the job is incredibly stressful. Pilots have hundreds of people’s lives in their hands, for example. And attendants? They put up with all kinds of abuse from passengers.That can make people difficult to deal with when they do arrive home.

9. Corporate executives

When you’re at or near the top of an organization, it’s a whole different ball game. You’re suddenly responsible for everything and everyone — and what they do, say, or screw up. There’s a reason these people tend to make so much money, after all. Power can also go to people’s heads. You might be the boss at work, but that doesn’t necessarily mean you’re the boss at home. Or in the relationship.

10. Media

Whether you’re a reporter or political pundit, working in the media can take its toll. Newspaper reporters, for example, have notoriously bad pay and work long hours. That’s not going to be pleasing to most spouses. And if you’re a notable, famous, or even semi-famous figure? That can attract all kinds of attention that can be hard to deal with, both negative and positive.

11. Teachers

You hear the horror stories, but nothing really replaces the actual experience of being an elementary school teacher. You have roughly 25 kids that you are responsible for each day, all with varying backgrounds, abilities, and mental states. You have an administration that always wants more from you, constant changes in curriculum, and at least one parent every year that thinks you’re the reason why their little “angel” isn’t excelling. Adding insult to injury, the pay is low and lunch breaks are short. Don’t forget to buy some classroom supplies with your own money because of budget cuts. By the time you head home, you’re exhausted and running on empty for your own kids and family. Sure, you get some summertime off, but that’s just enough time to crawl your way back from insanity only to have to face a fresh batch of chaos.
Source: www.cheatsheet.com/money-career/worst-jobs-for-arelationship.html/12/?ref=cpc_medium

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