Rachael
Scdoris

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Rachael scratched on 3/13 after gettubg up to 62nd of 95 mushers in the 2008 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race  More News. She finished 45th in 2009.

Bio
Results
2008 Idtarod
2006 Idtarod Status
Scdoris Conquers the Iditarod
Sledder blazes Iditarod trail for visually impaired - USA Today
Rachael Scdoris, in the beginning
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www.rachaelscdoris.com
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Bio


Rachael Scdoris, 24, was born in Oregon and graduated from Redmond High School in 2003. She says her occupation is sled dog racer and tour operator. Rachael was born with Congenital Achromatopsia, a rare vision disorder. She is colorblind and her acuity is 20/200. She is extremely light sensitive. She is a member of the Central Oregon Resources for Independent Living and the United States Association of Blind Athletes. Rachael was honored by the Women's Sports Foundation in New York City as one of the top women athletes in America. She served as Captain of her high school track and cross country teams. Rachael has been mushing since she was three years old and finished her first Iditarod in 2006. She says, "I love everything about dog mushing--working with dogs in the outdoors, the competition, and the ability to use all of my past experiences to improve my team. The Iditarod embodies all these things." Rachael enjoys "anything outdoors not involving a ball."

Snippets


Rachael Scdoris, the legally blind musher from Bend, Ore., had to call it a race this year, opting to scratch from the race after trying to leave Koyuk today behind her visual interpreter, Joe Runyan. After the team of mushers talked it over, Scdoris returned to the checkpoint to scratch and Runyan continued on to finish the race with a strong and fast team of 14 dogs. Scdoris had 10 dogs when she scratched. She was concerned with their health. Some were sick when she left Koyuk, race officials said. It’s a frustratingly late time for Scdoris to scratch. She has started the race three times, finishing in 2006.

 2008 Iditarod


2008. Best finish in two Iditarods, 57th in 2006. Scdoris, 22, was born with congenital achromatopsia, a rare vision disorder. She is colorblind and her acuity is 20/200. Former Iditarod champ Joe Runyan will be her trail guide.

Rachael Scdoris, 22, was born in Oregon and graduated from Redmond High School in 2003. She says her occupation is dog musher. Rachael was born with Congenital Achromatopsia, a rare vision disorder. She is colorblind and her acuity is 20/200. She is extremely light sensitive. She is a member of the United States Association of Blind Athletes and the National Chiuldren's Oral Health Foundation. Rachael had the honor of carrying the Olympic Torch to the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics. Rachael was honored by the Women’s Sports Foundation in New York City as one of the top women athletes in America. She served as Captain of her high school track and cross country teams. Rachael has been mushing since she was three years old and finisher her first Iditarod in 2006. She says, "I love everything about dog mushing--working with dogs in the outdoors, the competition, and the ability to use all of my past experiences to improve my team. The Iditarod embodies all these things." Rachael enjoys "sports without balls," reading, singing and volunteer work.

Scdoris Conquers the Iditarod


Twenty-one year old Rachael Scdoris is the first legally blind athlete to compete in the famed Iditarod, the longest sled dog race in the world, stretching 1,049 miles of arctic Alaskan interior from Anchorage to Nome, with not one but twelve dogs. March 18, 2996, after 12 days, 10 hours and 42 minutes on the trail, she finished in 58th place and was 7th out of 20 rookies who started the race.

Having endured tempuratures as low as -52 degrees Fahrenheit and wind speeds in excess of 60 miles per hour, Racherl took the worst that 1,100 miles of the Alaskan wilderness had to throw at her and kept on mushing. We salute the determination and skill that it took for Rachael to achieve her dream. Way to go Rachael!

2005: Rachael Scdoris, 20, is a rookie musher that was born in Oregon on February 1, 1985. She has been racing sled dogs since she was three years old, having been introduced to the sport with rides in her father's sled bag at the tender age of 18 months. Rachael has been training and racing her own team since she was eight. She turned "Sweet 16" while running the International Rocky Mountain Stage Stop Sled Dog Race in 2001.

After competing in numerous short and mid-distance races, including The Atta Boy 300 Oregon World Cup sled dog race, managed by her father Jerry Scdoris, Rachael has a dream of running the Iditarod. Being a very competitive person, her goal is to compete at the highest levels of the sport. To that end she has focused her ambition on the Iditarod, "The Last Great Race".

Rachael's first run was made as one of the youngest mushers to enter the Iditarod, and the first legally blind musher to do so. Navigating around the media may be as much of a challenge as the course itself. In the past year, she has been featured on National Geographic World, an ABC Sports feature, USA Today, Teen Magazine, Animal Planet, Web MDTV, Sports Illustrated for Women, Seventeen Magazine and a recent issue of Time Magazine's "Time for Kids". Closer to her own ambitions, Rachael is also featured on one million packages of Atta Boy dog food highlighting her image, story and dogs.

Rachael is also a fiercely competitive long-distance track and cross-country runner, a fashion model, a talented soprano vocalist, and a confident public speaker that graduated with a 3.5 GPA from Redmond High School. She earned her varsity letter as a freshman in cross-country in the fall, and acquired her varsity letter in track the following spring. Later, she qualified for the District Championship in both sports, running mainly against older, sighted girls. Rachael was ranked third nationally, in both the 1500 and 3000 meters by the United States Association of Blind Athletes (the USABA).

She is a member of the United States Association of Blind Athletes. Rachael had the honor of carrying the Olympic Torch to the Salt Lake City Winter Olympics. Rachael was honored by the Women's Sports Foundation in New York City as one of the top women athletes in America.

While Rachael has competed in stage stop races, where dog teams travel a specific distance each day, she has never run a continuous format such as the 1100-mile Iditarod. Rachael has finished the 500 Mile Wyoming Stage Stop, The Atta Boy 300 in Oregon, The Race to the Sky 350 in Montana and The John Beargrease Marathon 400 in Minnesota.

Born with congenital achromatopia (color blindness), Rachael has less than 20/200 vision and can't see at all in bright light. She can see her team and where the leaders are, but her vision is one-dimensional. The Iditarod board of directors has made accommodations by allowing Rachael to have "visual interpreters" traveling ahead to provide information on the trail and conditions as they vary between checkpoints.

Her visual interpreter for the 2006 Iditarod will be veteran Iditarod musher Tim Osmar. Visit her new Web site at www.gorachaelgo.com

Source: images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.cabelasiditarod.com/images/mushers/musher_scdorisr05.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.cabelasiditarod.com/mushers/scdorisr.html&h=205&w=154&sz=7&tbnid=gnFi4Wr4jGQFDM:&tbnh=100&tbnw=75&hl=en&start=4&prev=/images%3Fq%3D%2522Rachael%2BScdoris%2522%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26sa%3DG

Rachael Scdoris, in the beginning


Rachael Scdoris, who followed through on a childhood dream of running the Iditarod, despite being legally blind, has ended her first attempt more than halfway into the race. Scdoris opted to scratch at Eagle Island, one of the most remote and often bleakest points in any Iditarod.

She made the decision at 5:37 p.m. Wednesday based on the well being of her team, according to a press release issued by race officials. The rookie based in Bend, Ore., arrived at Eagle Island at 11:25 a.m. with 12 dogs. She was 66th - last place - when she made the decision. The scratch had nothing to do with her position in the race, however. She and visual interpreter, Paul Ellering, were on a pace to finish in adequate time. Scdoris was having an increasingly difficult time getting enough calories into her dogs and opted to scratch for their benefit, said Race Marshall Mark Nordman. Ellering decided to scratch at Eagle Island as well.

Eagle Island exists only as a temporary tent camp set up only for the Iditarod. It's location actually shifts year to year, but it is roughly 60 miles from Grayling and about as far from Kaltag, serving as a halfway point up the Yukon River with drop bags, fuel and a warm tent. It is 701 miles from Anchorage, and 421 miles from Nome.

Scdoris entered the Iditarod after more than a year of sometimes exhausting discussions with the Iditarod's board of directors. She was the first handicapped dog driver to approach the Iditarod seeking special arrangements in order to participate in the race. Scdoris was born with congenital achromatopsia, a non-degenerative retinal condition that severely limits her central vision to shadowy images. Her peripheral vision is excellent. She has 20-200 vision, is near- and far-sighted and color blind. Her vision has been described as like looking through a pair of glasses smeared with grease. The race organization waived one rule for her and another dog team serving as her visual interpreter. The two teams were allowed to communicate via radio so the team in front, Ellering, could warn her of approaching hazards.

The pair traveled slowly at first, but successfully negotiated the always-difficult Happy River steps up to Rainy Pass, and then the Dalzell Gorge down to Rohn. By the time they reached Nikolai, the general opinion among mushers was that Scdoris was an accomplished sled handler and should finish the race. But this has been one of the most grueling Iditarods in memory, and tiring for their dogs. Teams crossing the finish line in Nome are relieved to be done with it.

Source: images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.cabelasiditarod.com/images/coverage_2005/cov05_mar17_01-1.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.cabelasiditarod.com/coverage_2005/cov05_mar17_01.html&h=226&w=190&sz=12&tbnid=rJpTPYC3ckMOUM:&tbnh=103&tbnw=86&hl=en&start=1&prev=/images%3Fq%3D%2522Rachael%2BScdoris%2522%26svnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26sa%3DG

Results

Rachael scratched on 3/13 after getting up to 62nd of 95 mushers in the 2008 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race  

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