"Date Rape" Drugs

Menstuff® has compiled information on rape drugs. If you are male, it's important not only to know this information so you can help a friend who you judge might be under the influence of a date rape drug, but also know if it happens to you. Yes boys are incested, and boys and men are raped. You should know more about the issues for your own good and for the good of your friends.

What are "date rape" drugs?

What does Rohypnol look like?
Who uses Rohypnol and how?
Why has there been an increase in teen use of Rohypnol?
What happens if a person takes Rohypnol?
Is Rohypnol addictive?
Why is Rohypnol called a "date rape" drug?
What can I do to avoid becoming a victim of a date rape drug?
What should you do if there is a suspected assault?
Propective Measurse for Teens
Resources
Related Issues: 
Sexual Abuse, Sleep Assault

Q. What are "date rape" drugs?

A. The term "date rape" drug refers to illegal drugs that are sometimes used to overpower victims and sexually assault them. Presently, the two most common date rape drugs are gamma-hydroxybutyrate and flunitrazepam.

Gamma hydroxybutyrate (GHB) has been associated with sexual assault in cities throughout the country. GHB is a clear liquid or white powder that is often mixed with a carbonated, alcohol, or health food drink and is reportedly popular among adolescents and young adults. It generates feelings of euphoria or intoxication and was once sold in health food stores as a performance-enhancing supplement for body builders.

Banned by the FDA since 1990, this drug makes its victim unable to resist an attack and also causes memory loss. Police departments have reported its use during spring-break beach festivals. In Michigan, a 15-year-old girl died after taking the drug, and several teenagers have been hospitalized elsewhere in the country. It is also called "G," "Georgia Home Boy," "liquid ecstasy" (not to be confused with ecstasy), "somatomax," "scoop," or "grievous bodily harm."

Flunitrazepam is a powerful sleeping pill that is better known by its brand name Rohypnol (pronounced row-HIP-nole). This medicine, approximately 10 times stronger than Valium (diazepam), is neither approved for medical use, nor made or sold legally in the United States. However, it is made and prescribed legally in other countries for the treatment of insomnia (difficulty sleeping) and is then illegally smuggled into the United States. It is often used with alcohol or other drugs such as cocaine or heroine.

Being under the influence of this drug is sometimes referred to as being "roached out." Other street names for Rohypnol include: rophies, roofies, R2, roofenol, Roche, roachies, la rocha, rope, rib, circles, Mexican valium, roach-2, roopies, and ropies.

It is important that you educate yourself about these drugs and learn how best to protect yourself. Although the following paragraphs describe the increasing use of Rohypnol throughout the United States, both GHB and Rohypnol are dangerous drugs and using either of them can be devastating.

Q. What does Rohypnol look like?

A. The tablets are white, although counterfeit street versions may have a brownish-pink color. The tablets will have the word "ROCHE" on one side and an encircled "1" or "2" (depending on the dosage) on the other. For the most part, the pills have no color, smell or taste once they are dissolved in alcohol, soft drinks, water or any other liquid. A few users have reported a slightly bitter taste when the drug is mixed with alcohol.

Q. Who uses Rohypnol and how?

A. Increasing numbers of teenagers and young adults use this dangerous drug to create a "dramatic" high, usually in combination with alcohol.

Q. Why has there been an increase in teen use of Rohypnol?

A. First, Rohypnol is a low-cost drug, usually sold at less than $5 per tablet. Second, many young people wrongly believe it's a relatively harmless drug and that it is safe to buy because it comes in a pre-sealed, tamper-proof bubble pack. Third, many people mistakenly think that the drug cannot be detected with a urine test.

Q. What happens if a person takes Rohypnol?

A. Ultimately, this drug can cause a person to do and say things he or she would not normally want to. Because it has no strong taste or odor, victims whose drinks have been poisoned with Rohypnol don't realize what is happening.

Within 10-30 minutes after taking Rohypnol, a person may feel dizzy and disoriented. S/he will become confused and unable to make clear decisions. S/he may appear to be drunk, have blood-shot eyes and slurred speech. A person will feel too hot and too cold at the same time or feel nauseated. Ultimately, a person will find it difficult to speak and move, as s/he slowly loses coordination and control of her body before passing out. These effects peak within two hours, and can last up to eight hours. When combined with alcohol, marijuana, cocaine or other drugs, Rohypnol is particularly dangerous because it leaves the victim with no memory of what has happened. "Blackouts" lasting eight to 24 hours are commonly reported among victims who become intoxicated on a combination of alcohol and Rohypnol./

What are the effects of GHB on the victim?

  • drowsiness
  • dizziness
  • slow heart rate
  • nausea
  • loss of consciousness
  • inability to remember what happened while drugged
  • seizures
  • coma, death

What are the effects of ketamine on the victim?

  • hallucinations
  • lost sense of time and identity
  • agitation, aggressive or violent behavior
  • convulsions
  • loss of consciousness
  • loss of coordination
  • potentially fatal respiratory failure

What are the effects of rohypnol on the victim?

  • lower blood pressure
  • sleepiness
  • muscle relaxation or loss of muscle control
  • visual disturbances
  • loss of consciousness
  • problems talking
  • inability to remember what happened while drugged
  • nausea

Q. Is Rohypnol addictive?

A. Yes. You can become physically dependent on this drug. Withdrawal symptoms include headache, muscle pain, confusion, hallucinations and convulsions. Seizures can occur up to a week after you stop using Rohypnol.

Q. Why is Rohypnol called a "date rape" drug?

A. Because of its ability to make victims lose self control and forget what happened during significant periods of time, Rohypnol has been used by criminals to rape unsuspecting victims. Girls and women around the country have reported being raped after Rohypnol was slipped into their drink by their attacker, causing them to let down their guard, fall asleep, or even become unconscious. Because it has no taste or odor, the victims usually don't realize what is happening. Rohypnol also has been called the "forget pill," "trip-and-fall," and "mind-eraser."

Q. What can I do to avoid becoming a victim of a date rape drug?

A. Remember that these drugs are odorless, colorless and tasteless and can be added to ANY drink — even water.

  • Don't drink alcohol or use other drugs at social functions. They can affect your judgment and make it harder for you to stay in control.
  • If you do drink, do not accept an open drink from anyone you don't know well enough to trust completely.
  • Attend parties or visit bars with a group of friends, arranging beforehand to watch each other’s drinks.
  • If you arrive as a group, leave as a group.
  • At a bar or club, accept drinks only from the bartender, waiter or waitress.
  • If you accept a drink from someone you do not know well, make sure it comes from an unopened container (bottle or can) and that you open it yourself.
  • Never put your drink down and leave it unattended, even to go to the restroom.
  • Do not drink from punch bowls.
  • Watch out for your friends. If a friend shows symptoms of date-rape drug ingestion, seek medical attention immediately.
  • Tell girls/women you know about the effects of these dangerous drugs.
  • If you think that you or a friend has been a victim, notify the authorities immediately.

What should you do if there is a suspected assault?

A. If you are ill or injured, call 911 or go a hospital emergency department for treatment. If you want to report the incident, call the police and preserve the evidence – do not shower, change clothes, or brush your teeth – until you get a medical exam. Try not to urinate until medical/legal evidence is collected at the hospital. Your urine can be tested for the presence of sedating drugs. The sooner you get to the hospital, the more likely the drug will be found in your system.

Get emotional support and help. There are agencies specializing in sexual assault services in most communities. To be connected with a 24-hour confidential sexual assault hotline near you, call 800-656-HOPE (4673).

Find out more about date rape drugs by contacting the organizations listed in Resources.

Date Rape Drugs


Saying no to sex when you want to is a given. But what if you CAN'T say no? What if, the next day, you don't even remember being asked, or how you got to where you are, or who you were with? Worse still, what if you DON'T wake up at all?

Recently, a number of drugs which have been used for the purpose of committing rape have come to the attention of sex educators and health workers, and SIECUS, the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States, has issued a report today outlining some of those drugs, and a few helpful tips on what you can do to protect yourself. Read up on what they have to say, and think about what measures you can take to take care of yourself and keep from becoming a victim.

Fact Sheet: Drug Facilitated Sexual Assault


In recent years, drug-facilitated sexual assault has become a growing concern among health and community educators. A number of drugs have become known as "date rape drugs" or "predatory drugs" because they are used to incapacitate individuals for the purposes of committing a crime, often sexual assault.

Alcohol is the drug most commonly associated with sexual assault, but incidents involving other drugs are on the rise. These drugs, also called "club drugs" because of their popularity in dance clubs and bars, can be unknowingly given to a victim, incapacitate the victim, and prevent him/her from resisting during a sexual assault or other crime. They can also produce amnesia causing a victim to be unclear of what, if any, crime was committed. These drugs are particularly dangerous when combined with alcohol.

As with any coerced sexual activity, victims of drug-facilitated sexual assault cannot protect themselves from HIV, other sexually transmitted diseases, or unintended pregnancy.

This fact sheet to provide information on two of the most common predatory drugs, as well as suggestions for preventing drug-facilitated crimes.

GHB

GHB stands for gamma hydroxybutyrate acid, a central nervous system sedative often referred to by other names such as Grievous Bodily Harm, Liquid Ecstasy, Liquid G, Somatomax, Cherry Meth, Easy Lay and Gamma 10. Street names for ketamine include Special K, Ket and K, Vitamin K, Kit Kat, Keller, Cat Valium, Purple and Super C. Street names for rohypnol include Roofies, R2, Roofenol, Roche, Roachies, La Rocha, Rope, Rib, Circles, Mexican Valium, Roach-2, Roopies, Ropies, Forget Pill, Trip-and-Fall and Mind Erasers.

GHB was once sold in health food stores as a performance enhancer for body builders because it was believed to stimulate the production of human growth hormone. In 1990, the FDA banned the use of GHB because of reports of severe, uncontrollable side effects. GHB can produce drowsiness, dizziness, nausea, unconsciousness, seizures, severe respiratory depression, and coma. Overdose of GHB can occur quickly and can be fatal. Since 1990, there have been 5,700 documented cases of GHB abuse and more than 30 reported sexual assaults and 65 deaths attributed to this drug. Most of the GHB used today is a "homemade" mix of various chemical ingredients, including solvents. Homemade GHB is dangerous in part because there are significant differences in potency, purity, and concentration. The same amount taken from two separate batches can have very different effects. GHB is available both in liquid and powder forms. It is usually odorless and tasteless and therefore can be easily slipped unnoticed into a drink.

Rohypnol

Rohypnol is a brand name for Flunitrazepam, a powerful sedative that is often referred to by other names such as "roofies" and "roach." Rohypnol is not legally available for prescription in the United States but is legal in 60 countries for the treatment of insomnia. Rohypnol may cause users to feel intoxicated; they may have slurred speech, impaired judgment, and difficulty walking. The effects are often felt within 10 minutes and can last up to eight hours. Rohypnol can cause deep sedation, respiratory distress, and blackouts that can last up to 24 hours. There is a potential for overdose or death to occur, especially when mixed with alcohol or other drugs. Rohypnol is available in small white tablets that can be taken orally, ground up in a drink, or snorted. In 1997, the manufacturer of Rohypnol changed the formula so that it turns blue/green and can be more easily detected when added to liquids.

Propective Measurse for Teens

  • Drink from tamper-proof bottles and cans and insist on opening them.
  • Insist on pouring or watching while any drink is mixed or prepared. Do not drink from group drinks such as punch bowls.
  • Keep an eye on your drink or open soda can, do not trust someone to watch it for you.
  • If you think you've been drugged, do not be afraid to seek medical attention.
  • If someone passes out and you suspect predatory drugs, call for medical attention immediately and explain your concerns.

(Reprinted with permission from SHOP Talk, published by the Sexuality Informaiton and Education Council of the United States, 130 West 42nd Street, Suite 350, New York, NY 10036-7802.)

Don't forget basic safety standards when you're out in general. If you're going out to a club or party, always bring a friend that you know you can trust, and keep your eyes on one another. Don't ever go off alone or become sexually engaged (and yes, I'm even talking about kissing) with someone you have just met, and, no matter what age you are, it is never wise to get incapacitated at places like parties and clubs with people you do not know, and cannot trust. As much as it stinks, we cannot trust everyone we meet, and the safest thing to do is to insist anyone you meet earn your trust, over a long period of time, and in a non-sexual sphere.
Source: www.scarleteen.com/crisis/drug_report.html

Resources

www.clubdrugs.org - This Web site is a service of the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). The term "club drugs" refers to those drugs commonly used by young adults at all night dance parties, "raves," and bars. They include MDMA (Ecstasy), GHB, Rohypnol, Ketamine (Special K), Methamphetamine, and LSD. NIDA-supported research has shown that use of club drugs can cause serious health problems and, in some cases, even death. This Web site provides information on each of these drugs, as well as links to NIDA newsletters, publications, and other related information on the Web.

www.rehabilitation-center.org/addiction-resources/popular-club-drugs.html a brief guide about dangerous club drugs.

www.nsawi.health.org/compass -The National Substance Abuse Web Index (NSAWI) has been developed by the National Clearinghouse for Alcohol and Drug Information (NCADI) to assist the substance abuse prevention and treatment communities in obtaining relevant, authoritative information available on the World Wide Web. This index of Web sites includes only those sites that are considered by NCADI to be the most useful for prevention and treatment.

You can find out more about Rohypnol by contacting:

American Council for Drug Education, 800.488.3784, www.acde.org

American Society of Addiction Medicine, 301.656.3920, www.asam.org

Association for Medical Education and Research in Substance Abuse, 401.444.1817, www.amersa.org

Illinois Department of Public Health, www.idph.state.il.us/about/womenshealth/factsheets/date.htm

National Institute on Drug Abuse, 888.NIH.NIDA (644.6432) or www.nida.nih.gov . www.drugabuse.gov/ClubAlert/ClubdrugAlert.html

National Women's Health Information Center, Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 800-994-9662 www.4woman.gov/faq/rohypnol.htm

Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network. While much of this sounds like it's for girls or women only, boys and men do get drugged and raped and incested by family members. This network puts you in touch with people who are trained to assist both girls and boys as well as women and men.
800-656-HOPE
Source: www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/EMIHC276/23414/23416/351515.html?d=dmtContent

35:43

Devil's Breath: Scopolamine, AKA Burundanga, Hailed As 'World's Scariest Drug


Bank account bone dry?

Have the sneaking suspicion you spent the evening in a zombie-like state shuffling from bank machine to bank machine at the behest of South American crime lords?

Dude on your couch eating Cap'n Crunch in your pajamas, casting devious stares in your direction?

Yup. Sounds like you may have been the unwitting recipient of a blast of 'devil's breath'.

Or, at least, that's the diabolical scenario health experts are warning about amid the apparent surge in popularity of a drug called scopolamine. Also known as burundanga. Best remembered by its infernal street name.

Or, apparently, not remembered at all.

Hailed in a recent Vice documentary as 'the world's scariest drug,' scopolamine is tasteless, odourless and has a reputation for being something of a 'zombie' drug -- meaning victims are still very much active while they're on it, remembering precious little of those activities the next day.

In 2012, there were nearly 1,200 cases of scopolamine and other 'zombie' drugs being used on unsuspecting targets, GlobalPost reports. Among the victims? Well-known politicians, foreign embassy staff and average Colombian citizens.

“They go out to party and then wake up two or three days later on a park bench,” Maria Fernanda Villota, a nurse at San Jose University Hospital in Bogota, told GlobalPost.

The hospital, she says, receives several scopolamine victims every week. “They arrive here without their belongings or their money.”

Last month, El Mundo reported on four women who fell prey to the Devil's Breath in isolated incidents -- each case was marked by the use of paper sheets, apparently, doused with an alkaloid from the plant. Once inhaled, everything goes a little... zombie.

"I felt something in my head, I started feeling dizzy, my legs (grew heavy)..."

At some point, the victim claims she wasn't sure whether she was even married or had children.

Another victim recalls being "out of control."

"My head was spinning, I do not know how I gave them 300 euros ... I cannot remember anything."

Scopolamine does, however, have many legitimate uses -- from NASA using it to combat motion sickness to an aid in staving off depression.

A 2008 incident, which saw more than 20 people hospitalized after being slipped 'Devil's Breath' made the drug the subject of international headlines.

What's even scarier may not be just the drug's infernal applications -- but its sheer abundance.

Any of three plants in the Solanaceae family can produce it -- and all of them grow freely throughout much of South America.

And then there's the simplicity with which it can be administered.

In the Vice documentary, a Bogota drug dealer describes how Scopolamine can be blown in someone's face -- and, just minutes later, 'you can guide them wherever you want. It's like they're a child.

There may be one rather nasty drawback for those bent on amassing a zombie army -- sporadic bouts of unchecked aggression in the target.

“We’ve had cases in the emergency room in which we would have to treat both the victim who was intoxicated with the drug and the criminal whom he had beaten up,” Dr. Camilo Uribe, an expert on the drug based at San Jose University Hospital, told GlobalPost.

A deal with the Devil indeed.

VICE's Ryan Duffy went to Colombia to check out a strange and powerful drug called Scopolamine, also known as "The Devil's Breath." It's a substance so intense that it renders a person incapable of exercising free will. The first few days in the country were a harrowing montage of freaked-out dealers and unimaginable horror stories about Scopolamine.
Source: www.huffingtonpost.ca/2013/09/03/devils-breath-scopolamine_n_3860318.html



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