Media Watch - 2002

Menstuff® reports on what the press and/or some corporations are saying about men. This information is available in several ways. Mediawatch reviews the media's portrayal of men in advertising directed to or about men during 2001 and 2002. Often a click on the photo will present a larger picture. This page is basically a script format that includes comments that may not have images attached for 2002. See also 2001. Newsbytes are made up of stories and articles regarding men for 2002, 2001, 2000 and 1999.

After reviewing some of these topics, we encourage you to write the corporations and the government and give them your viewpoint. Change doesn't usually take place when only one complaint is received. If you want to be part of the solution, let them hear from you! Here's how.

D Tell Scholastic to Stop Sponsoring the Exploitation of Children
D Kellogg's Has Become Tasteless
C Women: Because the Moment Matters with Your Husband
C The West Wing on Sexism
C Campaign to End the Use of Land Mines
D Wal Mart Encourages "No Boundaries" This Valentine's Day
C AT&T Gets Award from DADs
M T-Shirts for Future Wife Beaters
D How the Hell is this Supposed to Sell Jeans
M Doritos Lack Taste
M Rotten Cotton & Old Crow Bourbon
D It's Not a Dare, It's a Hamburger
C He's Your Little Brother
D Blaze Seems to Set Fires
C Got Questions? Got Answers?
C Be Vocal. Say No Way!
C Kids Grow Up Fast These Days
C Are You Man Enough?
C Heroin: Dying's the Easy Part

Tell Scholastic to Stop Sponsoring the Exploitation of Children


Stop Commercial Exploitation of Children asks: Why is Scholastic sponsoring KidPower 2002, "the best and biggest conference on marketing to youth"? Scholastic’s corporate credo calls for the creation of educational materials to teach children.

Last year, after protests from DADs and SCEC (Stop Commercial Exploitation of Children) coalition members, Scholastic dropped its sponsorship of the fourth annual Golden Marble Awards and industry conference on marketing to children. However, despite their responsible actions of 2001, Scholastic is sponsoring this year's KidPower 2002 conference in Orlando on May 5-8. Essentially, the issues for Scholastic are the same as they were for the Golden Marble Awards.

KidPower 2002 workshops include "Creating effective on-air messages for Pre-schoolers,” and "Tracking kid trends: the timeless and the timely” The workshops promise that participants will "Walk away with insight into virtually every aspect of kid life, from what they watch to what they eat; from what they play to what they wear; from their private spaces to their public amusements, from their role models to their aspirations to their fears. . ."

For the health of all our children, please join us in a principled stand against the escalating commercial exploitation of children and call for Scholastic to drop its’ affiliation with KidPower 2002 and any similarly focused future conferences. Send an e-mail at: capwiz.com/dads/issues/alert/?alertid=133146&type=CU

 



Because DADs care about girls, we are often dismayed with the range of media messages that undermine our daughters' well being and ridicule a father's role in family life. That's why we're so happy to see AT&T's "I'm OK" television commercial. In the ad, a father calls his daughter to see how she's feeling - portraying a positive father-daughter relationship, good communication and the importance of father involvement.

Please join us in thanking AT&T for this positive marketing approach. Remember, it's just as important to recognize the good as it is to condemn the bad.

In addition, Dads and Daughters is presenting AT&T with our "Friend of Fathers and Daughters Award".

Go to http://capwiz.com/dads/issues/alert/?alertid=97014&type=CU to send your letter of thanks to AT&T.

Go to http://www.dadsanddaughters.org/I'm%20Oaky_30.mpg to view AT&T's commercial "I'm OK"

Go to http://www.dadsanddaughters.org/AT&T_letter.htm to view DADs' letter to AT&T.

Thank you for your support!

D Doritos Lack Taste


At first I thought I was watching a commercial from The Man Show. It featured cheerleaders doing a routine. The end of the routine had a guy lifting a girl with her standing on his hands above his head. It cuts to an announcer talking about Doritos Extreme chips and closing with the line "You're bold but are you daring?" Cut back to the male cheerleader. He looks around to see if anyone is looking, then he lifts his head as if to sneak a peek under the female cheerleaders skirt above him. Cut back to the announcer awarding the male cheerleader for being Bold and Daring. The message communicated to me is that Doritos Extreme chips are really tasteless.

If you want to be part of the solution, let them hear from you! Here's how. Dave Philips, VP Mktg & Adv, Frito-Lay, Div of Pepsico Inc., 7701 Legacy Dr, Plano, TX 75024-4099 or 972.334.7000 or fax 972.334.4800 or www.fritolay.com. And, Matthew Eiler, Sr VP, Acct Dir, BBDO Advertising, 1285 Avenue of the Americas, New York, NY 10019 or 212.459.5000 or fax to 212.459.6814

C B D M

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Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, nothing is going to get better. It's not. - The Lorax, Dr. Seuss



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