Hepatitis D (HDV)

Menstuff® has compiled information about Hepatitis D.

What is hepatitis D?
How common is hepatitis D?
How can I get hepatitis D?
What are the signs or symptoms of hepatitis D?
How can I find out if I have hepatitis D?
What can I do to reduce my risk of getting hepatitis D?
What is the treatment for hepatitis D?
Why worry about hepatitis D?
Do I need to talk to my partner about hepatitis D?
Should I talk to my health care provider about hepatitis D?
Where can I get more information?
Newsbytes

Resources
Free or Low-Cost Hepatitis Clinic Near You
- www.hepclinics.com
Related issues:
AIDS, Bacterial Vaginosis, Blue Balls, Chancroid, Chlamydia, Condoms, Contraception, Crabs, Genital Herpes, Genital Warts, Gonorrhea, Hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, Impotency, Nongonococcal Urethritis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, Reproduction, STDS, Syphilis, Trichomoniasis, Yeast Infection

What is hepatitis D?

Hepatitis D (HDV) is a viral liver infection that can only be acquired if a person has active hepatitis B (HBV).

How common is hepatitis D?

Hepatitis D is linked directly to hepatitis B, particularly to chronic HBV infection. There are particular pockets worldwide, such as Southeast Asia and China, where chronic HBV infection is high, but HDV infection is low or uncommon.

How can I get hepatitis D?

Hepatitis D is transmitted intravenously and possibly sexually.

It only infects people with active HBV infection.

HDV is passed most often through sharing IV drug needles with an infected person.

People receiving clotting factor concentrates may also be at a higher risk.

What are the signs or symptoms of hepatitis D?

People with both HBV and HDV are more likely to have sudden, severe symptoms (called fulminant hepatitis) that are often fatal.

People with both HBV and HDV are at greater risk for developing serious complications associated with chronic liver disease.

People infected with HBV and HDV may become chronically infected and may be contagious from time to time for the rest of their lives.

How can I find out if I have hepatitis D?

Your health care provider can test for hepatitis D through blood tests that identify HDV antigen or HDV antibodies.

What can I do to reduce my risk of getting hepatitis D?

Preventing hepatitis B through vaccination also prevents hepatitis D since hepatitis B must be present in order for HDV infection to occur.

What is the treatment for hepatitis D?

Most people with acute viral hepatitis experience a self-limited illness (one that runs a defined, limited course) and go on to recover completely. There is no accepted therapy, nor restrictions on diet or activity.

In most cases, hospitalization should be considered for patients who are severely ill for provision of supportive care.

Your health care provider can help you make decisions about your care needs based upon your medical history and liver condition.

Why worry about hepatitis D?

Hepatitis D, can cause a more severe acute disease than an HBV infection alone. This can result in death.

When hepatitis D, is acquired and HBV infection already exists, chronic liver diseases with cirrhosis are more likely to occur than with an HBV infection alone.

People with chronic HBV and HDV have a greater chance of developing chronic liver disease and cirrhosis.

Do I need to talk to my partner about hepatitis D?

When you and your partner understand how hepatitis D is passed, you can both agree to protect your health. Remember:

Should I talk to my health care provider about hepatitis D?

You should talk to your health care provider about hepatitis D if:

Remember: getting vaccinated against hepatitis B helps prevent an HDV infection as well.

Where can I get more information?

If you have additional questions about hepatitis D, call the National STD and AIDS Hotlines at 1-800-342-2437 or 1-800-227-8922. The hotlines are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For information in Spanish call 1-800-344-7432, 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Eastern Time, seven days a week. For the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing call 1-800-243-7889, 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. The hotlines provide referrals and more answers to your questions. http://www.ashastd.org/stdfaqs/hepd.html

Newsbytes


FDA Advisers Plug Hepatitis B Drug


A failed HIV therapy should be sold instead to treat the liver-destroying hepatitis B virus, advisers to the Food and Drug Administration ruled.
Source: www.intelihealth.com/IH/ihtIH/EMIHC000/333/333/353377.html

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