Nongonococcal Urethritis (NGU)

Menstuff® has compiled information on the issue of Nongonococcal Urethritis.

What is NGU?
How common is NGU?
How can I get NGU?
What are the signs or symptoms of NGU?
How can I find out if I have NGU?
What can I do to reduce my risk of getting NGU?
What is the treatment for NGU?
Why worry about NGU?
Do I need to talk to my partner about NGU?
Should I talk to my health care provider about NGU?
Where can I get more information?
Resources
Related issues:
Talking With Kids About Tough Issues AIDS, Bacterial Vaginosis, Blue Balls, Chancroid, Chlamydia, Condoms, Contraception, Crabs, Genital Herpes, Genital Warts, Gonorrhea, Hepatitis A, B, C, D, E, Impotency, Nongonococcal Urethritis, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease, Reproduction, STDS, Syphilis, Trichomoniasis, Yeast Infection

What is NGU?

NGU (NonGonococcal Urethritis) is an infection of the urethra caused by pathogens (germs) other than gonorrhea.

How common is NGU?

Several types of germs cause NGU, the most common and serious is chlamydia. Chlamydia is very common in both males and females. The diagnosis of NGU is more commonly made in males than in females, mainly due to the anatomical differences.

Germs that can cause NGU include but are not limited to:

How can I get NGU?

What are the signs or symptoms of NGU?

How can I find out if I have NGU?

An NGU diagnosis is made when a man has urethritis (inflammation of the urethra), but gonorrhea is ruled out because he has a negative gonorrhea culture and/or gram stain.

Other tests include:

Women:

What can I do to reduce my risk of getting NGU?

What is the treatment for NGU?

The main treatments for NGU are:

Alternatives are:

Recommended treatment for recurrent/persistent urethritis:

A woman who is pregnant, or thinks she might be, should tell her doctor. This will ensure that a medicine will be used that will not harm the baby.

Follow-up:

Why worry about NGU?

Left untreated, the germs that cause NGU-especially chlamydia-can lead to:

Men:

Women:

Exposure to the germs causing NGU during passage through the birth canal may result in infants having:

Do I need to talk to my partner about NGU?

Yes. If you have been told that you have NGU, talk to your partner(s), and let them know so they can be tested and treated. The most common cause of NGU is chlamydia, and it is easy to pass from an infected partner to one who is not infected.

Remember: Do not have sex until your partner(s) have been tested and treated.

Should I talk to my health care provider about NGU?

If you are sexually active with more than one person and do not use latex condoms, then you should talk to your health care provider about being tested for STDs and NGU. Not all STDs cause symptoms, and you may have one and not know it.

Where can I get more information?

If you have additional questions about NGU, call the National STD and AIDS Hotlines at 1-800-342-2437 or 1-800-227-8922. The hotlines are open 24 hours a day, seven days a week. For information in Spanish call 1-800-344-7432, 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 a.m. Eastern Time, seven days a week. For the Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing call 1-800-243-7889, 10:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. Eastern Time, Monday through Friday. The hotlines provide referrals and more answers to your questions. www.ashastd.org/stdfaqs/ngu.html

*    *    *



Contact Us | Disclaimer | Privacy Statement
Menstuff® Directory
Menstuff® is a registered trademark of Gordon Clay
©1996-2008, Gordon Clay